Get Filestream Storage Directory

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Filestreams are a great way to store files in SQL Server. SQL Server makes this super easy by managing the storage of the physical files on the file system. But what if you want to get access to these files or if you want to know where they are stored. SQL Server wants you to access these files through a network share managed by SQL Server. They provide a function called PathName that you can call to get this path. You will call this function like you would call an extension method in .Net. In the example below, we will assume that the column InvoiceFile is a Filestream datatype. We call the PathName() function to get the share name to where the files are stored.

How To Pull Single Value From XML

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SQL Server has a built in method for easily pulling one value from an XML. To do this you use the method called .value(). The .value method will run an XQuery against the XML specified in the query. This method is scalar, so it will only return 1 value. You cannot use this to return multiple values.

In the query above, you can see that you can just pass the xpath and the datatype that you want the output to be. This will pull that value out of the XML and put it in the specified format. You can see that after the xpath, there is a funny syntax [1]. This tells SQL Server to grab the first instance of the AnimalName node. You need to do this because the .value() method only returns one value and will not work with a repeating node.

Reference: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178030.aspx

Cross Apply In SQL

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CROSS APPLY is one of those helpful things in SQL Server that most people don’t think of or may not even know about. In this article I’d like to talk about what the APPLY operator is and how we can use it to simply our sql statements.

APPLY Operator
The APPLY operator allows you to join a table to a table-valued function. A table-valued function is a function that will return a table with one or more columns. With the apply operator, you can pass values from the first table in to the table-valued function.

There are only 2 types of APPLY operators:
CROSS APPLY – Returns records when a value from both sides of the operator match. Like an INNER JOIN.
OUTER APPLY – Returns all rows from the other side of the operator and will return the value or NULL from the table-valued function. This is like an OUTER JOIN.

In the example above, you can see that we join to the GetAnimalHabitat function using the CROSS APPLY. You can imagine that this function does a bunch of logic that is not visible in this query. If the GetAnimalHabitat function had 25 lines of code, you can see how this simplifies the above query dramatically.

Additional Thoughts
The APPLY operator can simplify the code, but could be accomplished by joining to a sub query as well. One difference is that the function in the APPLY operator is being executed for every row in the outer table. If you use the APPLY operator, make sure that you test the speed of your query to make sure that it did not degrade performance.

Get Filestream Storage Directory

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Filestreams are a great way to store files in SQL Server. SQL Server makes this super easy by managing the storage of the physical files on the file system somewhere. But what if you want to get access to these files or if you just want to know where they’re stored. SQL Server provides a function called PathName that you can call to get this path. You call this function like you would call an extension method in .Net. In the example below, we’ll assume that the column InvoiceFile is a Filestream datatype.

SQL Server Replace

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Replacing text in SQL Server is easy. SQL Server has the REPLACE function to perform this task.

SQL Server REPLACE
The REPLACE function in SQL Server has 3 parameters.

  1. Text to search
  2. Text to find
  3. Text to replace with

The output is: Full text to replace in

In the above example, we are searching “Text to search in” for the word “search” and we are replacing it with the word “replace”. Pretty simple, right? Now let’s take it a step further.

SQL Server Case Sensitive Replace
Above we went over how to do a case insensitive replace on a string. (The REPLACE function actually uses the default collation of the input text that it is searching). To turn it in to a SQL Server case sensitive replace, we just need to add one small thing to the end. We need to change the collation of the text we are searching. Learn more about text collation here.

The output is: Full text to search in

This example shows how the “SEARCH” text was not found because we are changing the input text to search collation to SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS (which is case sensitive). The input string has “search” in lower case and we were searching for an upper case “SEARCH”.

 
Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186862(v=sql.120).aspx