SQL Server Rename Column

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This article will cover how to rename a column in SQL Server. The function of a SQL Server rename column is not performed too often. Usually we do this when we roll out a new product and we want to make a column more generic.

 
SQL Server Rename Column (SQL Server 2005 and beyond)

They make this super simple. Just remember to put to single quotes around the parameters.

The above SQL Server rename column code snippet has a few parts to it. Here is the breakdown:

  • sp_rename – This is a system stored procedure will rename different types of objects in SQL Server.
  • ‘Animals.AnimalName’ – This is the tablename and column that I would like to rename.
  • ‘AnimalRealName’ – This is the new name that I would like to call the column.
  • ‘COLUMN’ – This is the type of object that you would like to rename is. To rename a column, always leave this value ‘COLUMN’.

 
If you would like to know how to do a SQL Server rename column for SQL Server versions prior to 2005, please leave a note in the comments.

 
 
Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188351(v=sql.90).aspx

SQL Server 2014 Feature – Non-Clustered Indexes For Table Variables

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This is truly an amazing feature to add to SQL Server 2014. I use table variables all the time and this was the only thing I didn’t like about them. Up to this point, SQL Server did not support having non-clustered indexes on table variables (the one with the name that starts with the @). If you wanted to do this, you had to create/use a temp table (the one with the name that starts with #).

With SQL Server 2014, they changed this and now allow the table variables to have non-clustered indexes as well. To do this, we simply add a little bit of extra code after the column declaration.

In the sample above, we create a table variable called @AnimalTableVar. Then when we declare the column AnimalName, we add an index called IX_AnimalTempTable_AnimalName.

Here is how selecting from this table shows up in the execution plan!
Non-Clustered Indexes For Table Variables

Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188927(v=sql.120).aspx

FORCE ORDER Query Hint

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When querying out data, SQL Server has a ton of different query hints. One less commonly known query hint is FORCE ORDER. So here we will talk about what this query hint does and how we can use it efficiently.

FORCE ORDER
When you put this query hint on to your query, it tells SQL Server that when it executes the statement to not change the order of the joins in the query. It will join the tables in the exact order that is specified in the query. Normally the SQL Server optimizer will rearrange your joins to be in the order that it thinks will be optimal for your query to execute.

To use the FORCE ORDER query hint, you will want to add this at the end of your query.

 
Example Without FORCE ORDER

This is the actual execution plan without the FORCE ORDER hint. You can see that SQL Server starts at the table Animal and AnimalHabitat tables, then goes to the Habitat table. If you look at our query above, we clearly list the tables in the order of Habitat, AnimalHabitat, then Animal.

Execution Plan Without Force Order

 
Example With FORCE ORDER

In the screenshot below, it shows the actual execution plan with the FORCE ORDER hint. In the new query, you can see that SQL Server starts with the Habitat and AnimalHabitat tables and then moves to the Animal table. It does this because when we turn on the FORCE ORDER option, it uses the order of the tables specified in the query syntax.

Execution Plan With Force Order

 
What Is This Used For
The FORCE ORDER query hint is only used when you want to override the way that SQL Server wants to execute this query. Normally you will just let SQL Server figure out how to get the data from the database. It does such a good job at it, that you do not usually need to override this functionality.

Occasionally SQL Server will not figure out the most optimal way to pull this data out. In this case you may want to try this query hint.

SQL Server Port

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The SQL Server port is 1433.

The client application port that connects to SQL Server is usually a random port between 1024 and 5000. This port on the client computer is what port SQL Server will use to send data back to the client with.

 
Firewall Considerations
If you are looking to setup a firewall to work with SQL Server ports, you will need to make the following settings:

  • Allow traffic from any port greater than 1024 to port 1433
  • Allow traffic from port 1433 to any port greater than 1024

SQL Server Word Sound Comparison

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As we learned in a previous post, you can use the SOUNDEX function to understand the sound that a word makes. You can then compare it to another word to see if the sound matches. This works okay for exact sound matches. But what if you want check to see if the word sound similar to another word? And how do you find out how similar the words are? SQL Server has you covered. In SQL Server 2005 they released the DIFFERENCE function.

 
The DIFFERENCE Function
When you use the SOUNDEX function in SQL Server, it returns a 4 character code that represents the sound of the word. The DIFFERENCE function compares two of these 4 character codes and returns a value between 0 and 4. The return value indicates how many of these characters in the 4 character code were the same. Here is an example:

Word SOUNDEX Code
Frog F620
Blog B420

DIFFERENCE: 2

You can see in the example above that if you compare the SOUNDEX code of the two words, only 2 characters are identical. The ‘F’ is different from the ‘B’. The ‘6’ is different from the ‘4’. But the ‘2’ and the ‘0’ are the same between the two codes. Thus… the difference is 2.

 
Put It All Together
Now that you understand how SOUNDEX and DIFFERENCE work, you can use them to create searches that are based on “sounding like a word”. Here is an example… remember, 0 means the words sound nothing alike and 4 means that the words sound exactly alike. In my example, I am going to match on a likeness of 3… which is sounding pretty similar.

 
 
Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188753.aspx